General Norman Schwarzkopf Jr., RIP

608px-NormanSchwarzkopf


SJ Mercury:

Retired Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf dies at 78

A U.S. official says retired Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf Jr., who commanded the U.S.-led international coalition that drove Saddam Hussein’s forces out of Kuwait in 1991, has died. He was 78.

The official tells The Associated Press that Schwarzkopf died Thursday in Tampa, Fla. The official wasn’t authorized to release the information publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

A much-decorated combat soldier in Vietnam, Schwarzkopf was known popularly as “Stormin’ Norman” for a notoriously explosive temper.

He lived in retirement in Tampa, where he had served in his last military assignment as commander-in-chief of U.S. Central Command. That is the headquarters responsible for U.S. military and security concerns in nearly 20 countries from the eastern Mediterranean and Africa to Pakistan.


Another life-long public servant and real-life hero has passed on. Soldiers don’t start wars, they just fight them.

Hate the war, not the warrior.

“Old soldiers never die, they just fade away.” – General Douglas MacArthur


UPDATE:

Awards:

Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Army Distinguished Service Medal
Navy Distinguished Service Medal
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medal
Silver Star
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit
Distinguished Flying Cross
Bronze Star
Purple Heart


Wiki:

In Vietnam in March 1970, Schwarzkopf was involved in rescuing men of his battalion from a minefield.[4] He had received word that men under his command had encountered a minefield on the notorious Batangan Peninsula, he rushed to the scene in his helicopter, as was his custom while a battalion commander, in order to make his helicopter available. He found several soldiers still trapped in the minefield. Schwarzkopf urged them to retrace their steps slowly. Still, one man tripped a mine and was severely wounded but remained conscious. As the wounded man flailed in agony, the soldiers around him feared that he would set off another mine. Schwarzkopf, also wounded by the explosion, crawled across the minefield to the wounded man and held him down (using a “pinning” technique from his wrestling days at West Point) so another could splint his shattered leg. One soldier stepped away to break a branch from a nearby tree to make the splint. In doing so, he too hit a mine, which killed him and the two men closest to him, and blew an arm and a leg off Schwarzkopf’s artillery liaison officer. Eventually, Schwarzkopf led his surviving men to safety, by ordering the division engineers to mark the locations of the mines with shaving cream. (Some of the mines were of French manufacture and dated back to the Indochina conflict of the 1950s; others were brought by Japanese forces in World War II). Schwarzkopf says in his autobiograpy It Doesn’t Take a Hero that this incident firmly cemented his reputation as an officer who would risk his life for the soldiers under his command.

Schwarzkopf told his men that they might not like some of his strict rules, but it was for their own good. He told them “When you get on that plane to go home, if the last thing you think about me is ‘I hate that son of a bitch’, then that is fine because you’re going home alive.”[4] Lt. General Hal Moore later wrote that it was during his time in Vietnam that Schwarzkopf acquired what later became his infamous temper, while arguing via radio for passing American Hueys to land and pick up his wounded men.[7]


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21 Responses to General Norman Schwarzkopf Jr., RIP

  1. piper says:

    Fontella Bass who had a one hit record in 1965, Rescue Me, dead at age 72.

    RIP Fontella Bass and Norman Schwarzkopf

  2. myiq2xu (D) says:

    Via Ace of Spades:

    “Barbara and I mourn the loss of a true American patriot and one of the great military leaders of his generation. A distinguished member of that Long Gray Line hailing from West Point, General Norm Schwarzkopf, to me, epitomized the ‘duty, service, country’ creed that has defended our freedom and seen this great Nation through our most trying international crises. More than that, he was a good and decent man — and a dear friend. Barbara and I send our condolences to his wife Brenda and his wonderful family.” – George H.W. Bush

  3. well myiq—-you wondered who would be the third…..

    glad it wasn’t 41

  4. HELENK says:

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/100341727

    weird but something to think about
    death and taxes

  5. votermom says:

    OT: We just watched (on dvr) a cnbc special called “Faking The Grade: Classroom Cheaters”.
    They mentioned how in college, being investigated for plagiarism can go on one’s transcript. And of course it pops into my head – hm, another possible reason Teh Once’s would seal his transcript.
    Because passing someone else’s work as his own is totally his style.

  6. ok myiq—-I have referenced you AGAIN in my latest blog post. Of course, I attributed it to you. You’re so smart…….

    http://womenwintoo.blogspot.com/2012/12/this-should-have-been-new-senator-from.html

  7. myiq2xu (D) says:

    WTF?

    A music theater student has won a stalking order against her parents who admitted they installed monitoring software on her computer and phone to ensure that she succeeded.

    David and Julie Ireland have been ordered to have no contact with their 21-year-old daughter – their only child – before September 23, 2013 and must keep 500 feet away from her at all times.

    The unusual case concerns Aubrey Ireland, a musical theater major who regularly fills lead roles at Cincinnati’s prestigious College-Conservatory of Music and has made the Dean’s List every quarter.

    Despite this success, her parents often drove 600 miles from their home in Leawood, Kansas, to visit her unannounced and to accuse her of promiscuity, of using drugs and of having mental issues.

  8. Belmont Club also has a great quote from Stormin’ Norman.

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