Not a photoshop

Will the smartest POTUS ever raise his hand?


The Obots AttackWatch trolls are out in force claiming this picture is:

a) a photoshop

or

b) not the “real” photo

This is an open thread.


About Myiq2xu - BA, JD, FJB

I was born and raised in a different country - America. I don't know what this place is.
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22 Responses to Not a photoshop

  1. myiq2xu says:

    b) not the “real” photo

    I just saw mood disorder troll claiming that at TGW.

    More likely:

    c) Obama screwed up the first picture so they had to take another.

  2. WMCB says:

    LMAO! Jeebus, could he look any more self-absorbed and idiotic?

    Who doesn’t know not to do that when posing for a formal group photo? Who??

  3. votermom says:

    I saw that last night and every time I see it I LOL. It’s so Alfred E. Neuman.

    I just noticed that he’s even got that weird side angle pose like he’d doing a glamour shoot or something.

  4. Three Wickets says:

    Is Buffett becoming the new Soros.

  5. Three Wickets says:

    Obama Says ‘Coordinated Action’ Needed Globally

    The focus in all these conversations will be how can we once again take the steps that we need to take in our own countries that are sufficiently bold,” Ben Rhodes, deputy White House national security adviser, said at a briefing yesterday.

    I personally have a problem with a 32 year old flak with a degree in fiction writing from NYU expounding about the economic and security problems facing the whole fucking world.

    • ralphb says:

      Shorter version of the letter sent to Bernanke that you posted about earlier.

      Dear Fed,

      We are afraid what you are doing will make things better. We want things to get worse. So stop.

      Sincerely,
      The Republican Party

  6. ralphb says:

    PaST cronyism’s bill comes due.

    Chicago Tribune: Law gives huge pension perks to union leaders

    All it took to give nearly two dozen labor leaders from Chicago a windfall worth millions was a few tweaks to a handful of sentences in the state’s lengthy pension code.

    The changes became law with no public debate among state legislators and, more importantly, no cost analysis.

    Twenty years later, 23 retired union officials from Chicago stand to collect about $56 million from two ailing city pension funds thanks to the changes, a Tribune/WGN-TV investigation found.

  7. Three Wickets says:

    Here is the Fed’s latest announcement. No QE3, more like QE2.5. Over the next 9 months, it will mostly be selling $450 billion in short treasuries (0 to 3 years) in exchange for $450 in long treasuries (6 to 30 years), helping to refinance Treasury debt a bit and returning more liquidity into commercial and money markets. Some of this twist operation will also be used by the Fed to keep rolling over its investment in GSE mortgage securities (but not buying more, which means any further help with mortgage refinancings will have to come from govt). All this will help keep borrowing rates down, it’s an indication that the Fed believes the economy is getting weaker not stronger and thinks deflation and/or unemployment is a bigger threat than inflation. On the news, 10 year treasuries are down to 1.87%, lowest in over 60 years. Equity markets are down a bit too. Both bearish signs. Overall fairly dovish from Bernanke.

    • Mary says:

      Wow. Indicates the Fed sees us possibly moving into a Double Dip Recession.

      Not good news.

      • jjmtacoma says:

        I’m sure we’ve been in the “double dip” for a couple months.

        People are being jetisoned from companies again and the “direct” openings are drying up.

        They only ever declare the “recession” when we’ve been there a while. I’d like to know how this long period of joblessness and economic contraction compares to a real “depression” and if we are just on one of the many bumps to come rather than a “double dip” (isn’t that what inconsiderate people do at parties? It sounds so harmless!).

    • ralphb says:

      Not bad overall. Kind of a “bite me” to McConnell et al, which is also a good thing in maintaining independence.

  8. ralphb says:

    Stephen Bannon, Amy Siskand and Anand Giridharadas on Sarah Palin and politics.

    http://thevictorysessions.com/2011/09/18/anand-giridharadas-on-sarah-palin-and-the-presidential-race-2-of-3/

    Anand Giridharadas is just great in this interview and part 3.

  9. KC says:

    About that photo:

    I personally think Obama is a self-centered clueless, classless ass. And that’s exactly what he looks like in the “wave” photo.

    But… it seems obvious that the wave photo was not the “take”. No one is settled, and some leaders are even cut out. It looks like a test shot to me. Yes, it was silly for Obama to wave, but we really don’t know what was going on in that obviously casual moment.

    I just don’t think that “gotcha” games serve our collective best interest. Making a big deal out of this picture is not much different than the ‘Bots having fits over Sarah Palin writing “refudiate” instead of “repudiate” or “refute”.

  10. ralphb says:

    Al Jazeera English documentary. h/t Lambert

    The men who crashed the world

    In the first episode of Meltdown, we hear about four men who brought down the global economy: a billionaire mortgage-seller who fooled millions; a high-rolling banker with a fatal weakness; a ferocious Wall Street predator; and the power behind the throne.

    The crash of September 2008 brought the largest bankruptcies in world history, pushing more than 30 million people into unemployment and bringing many countries to the edge of insolvency. Wall Street turned back the clock to 1929.

    But how did it all go so wrong?

    Lack of government regulation; easy lending in the US housing market meant anyone could qualify for a home loan with no government regulations in place.

    Also, London was competing with New York as the banking capital of the world. Gordon Brown, the British finance minister at the time, introduced ‘light touch regulation’ – giving bankers a free hand in the marketplace.

    All this, and with key players making the wrong financial decisions, saw the world’s biggest financial collapse.

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